O Lady
as I walk your road of death and dying,
strip from me those things that hinder my steps.

Strip me from me my vanity,
my concern for the regard, lust, and admiration of others.

Strip from me my arrogance,
my assurance that I know best for myself and others.

Strip from me my pride,
in my body, my face, my youth, and my beauty.

Strip from me my reliance on my intellect,
my wit, and my words.

Strip from me my judgment of others;
I do not know their story or their path.

Strip from me my wastefulness
when I take abundance, health, family, and friends for granted.

Strip from me my impatience and irritation.

Strip from me my fear of being stripped.

Strip from me all the things I cannot cast off myself.

Strip from me everything I cling to in disillusion and fear.

Strip these things from me as flesh is stripped from bone.

Help me to allow these things to rot, decay, putrefy, and fall away.
Send your maggots to feast on my festering rot
until I feel the clamor of snakes, worms, and beetles
cleaning my bones.

A Prayer to Hela, For Humility
by Anya Kless (via queenofsquirls)

(via perdiddle)

Wyrd Designs: Musings on Hella.

rokkatru:

When it comes to Hella I’ve seen a range of theories… some that she may be a much older Goddess (connecting back to Frau Holle, perhaps even older), some that she may not have truly been a Goddess at all but simply just a ‘personification’ of Hel, as some scholars point to the fact she’s not really written about until late in the Viking Age after Christianity had already become the reigning religion.

Read More »

(via lokeanconcubine)


Hel - Der Tod und Das Madchen by ~WintersKnight

Hel or Hela is the goddess of the underworld in Norse mythology and ruler over the dead who do not go to Valhalla. This includes those who die of natural causes and old age. 
She is the daughter of Loki and Angrboda, and the sister of Fenrir the wolf and Jormungandr the Midgard Serpent.”



I know a certain someone who might greatly enjoy this. Gonna leave it here, for her to stumble upon. 

Hel - Der Tod und Das Madchen by ~WintersKnight

Hel or Hela is the goddess of the underworld in Norse mythology and ruler over the dead who do not go to Valhalla. This includes those who die of natural causes and old age. 

She is the daughter of Loki and Angrboda, and the sister of Fenrir the wolf and Jormungandr the Midgard Serpent.”


I know a certain someone who might greatly enjoy this. Gonna leave it here, for her to stumble upon. 

(via rokkatru)

proudlypagan:

Hel - Goddess of the Underworld
Cold, this misty night
A black moon’s preparing my mind
Out here, I seek her shrine
I welcome the queen of the lowest world
Into the ice hall
Where mirrors reflect my soul
She’s freezing my tears
Taking all fears
Two sides to her face
Her claws pierce or embrace
Enter, with open eyes
You’ll see her garden of delight
To the within
Beyond our memory
Falling so deep
Where unborn souls sleep
Hail, to the queen of death
Her shadow walks with you
Remember her kind
And understand life
Invisible mate
Waiting to seal our fate
Watch my strife
Hel, guard my life
Cold, this misty night
A black moon’s preparing my mind
Beneath eternal fog
I have seen clear

proudlypagan:

Hel - Goddess of the Underworld

Cold, this misty night

A black moon’s preparing my mind

Out here, I seek her shrine

I welcome the queen of the lowest world

Into the ice hall

Where mirrors reflect my soul

She’s freezing my tears

Taking all fears

Two sides to her face

Her claws pierce or embrace

Enter, with open eyes

You’ll see her garden of delight

To the within

Beyond our memory

Falling so deep

Where unborn souls sleep

Hail, to the queen of death

Her shadow walks with you

Remember her kind

And understand life

Invisible mate

Waiting to seal our fate

Watch my strife

Hel, guard my life

Cold, this misty night

A black moon’s preparing my mind

Beneath eternal fog

I have seen clear


As Stubborn as Hel’s Bull by wanderingmage
Photograph taken June 2011 in Berlin, Germany at Alboinplatz in the Templehof area.According to local folk tradition, there was a sacrificial stone altar beside the great lake tended by a pagan priest, and the Goddess Hel (who was believed to dwell at the bottom of the lake) would send up black bulls that emerged from the water. These bulls would help the priest clear the land, and work it. The land itself was blessed, and would provide plenty of grain that kept the priest well fed.But as the priest grew old, he took it as a sign when one day a Christian monk appeared at the lake that his time on Midgard was ending. He asked the holy man to continue to look after the place of sacrifice. But after the Pagan priest had passed from the world of the living the monk refused to honor a Pagan Goddess. Hel was greatly displeased and sent Her bulls foaming up from the water after the monk, and the monk was killed. Since then, it is said in some versions of the local folk tales that instead of waiting for others to sacrifice to Her in an age of Christianity, that the Goddess Herself lures victims to Her holy waters, and takes them as drowned sacrifices.I am uncertain if this particular folk tale has been translated into English, but through the years, and the pagan grapevine I’ve heard of several other pagans who have in one source or another stumbled across this local folk tale. There appears to be other versions of the folk tradition out there as well, such as an alternate version that describes the Christian monk reconverting back to paganism after being chased by the Goddess’s bull, or a version where instead of this being Hel’s pond it belongs to Frau Holle.Some scholars and believers think that Hel and Frau Holle may be connected, and possibly the same Goddess. While others think that belief is completely misguided. Even this one account (in German) I found online from the local Berlin Körper Geist Seele Magazine [link]tries to convey the claim they are the same Goddess. Certainly they both have some similarities, such as connections with the dead. But I am always personally a little leery of the scholarship that tries to make a vast amalgam of the various deities. A Berlin tourist site [link]mentions it briefly in English and calls it Hel’s Pond.Once at the site, my friend and I walked around it. We managed to find a nice little lull on one side of the park where no one else was around where we were able to quietly pour out drinks in offering to the Goddess, and give offerings. We each hailed the Goddess in our own observances. I would say that the offerings were well received because two magpies descended before us on the path, as soon as we finished giving our offerings. The avian duo paused a moment before us on the path, and then flitted away.For more information, go here: [link]

As Stubborn as Hel’s Bull by wanderingmage

Photograph taken June 2011 in Berlin, Germany at Alboinplatz in the Templehof area.

According to local folk tradition, there was a sacrificial stone altar beside the great lake tended by a pagan priest, and the Goddess Hel (who was believed to dwell at the bottom of the lake) would send up black bulls that emerged from the water. These bulls would help the priest clear the land, and work it. The land itself was blessed, and would provide plenty of grain that kept the priest well fed.

But as the priest grew old, he took it as a sign when one day a Christian monk appeared at the lake that his time on Midgard was ending. He asked the holy man to continue to look after the place of sacrifice. But after the Pagan priest had passed from the world of the living the monk refused to honor a Pagan Goddess. Hel was greatly displeased and sent Her bulls foaming up from the water after the monk, and the monk was killed. Since then, it is said in some versions of the local folk tales that instead of waiting for others to sacrifice to Her in an age of Christianity, that the Goddess Herself lures victims to Her holy waters, and takes them as drowned sacrifices.

I am uncertain if this particular folk tale has been translated into English, but through the years, and the pagan grapevine I’ve heard of several other pagans who have in one source or another stumbled across this local folk tale. There appears to be other versions of the folk tradition out there as well, such as an alternate version that describes the Christian monk reconverting back to paganism after being chased by the Goddess’s bull, or a version where instead of this being Hel’s pond it belongs to Frau Holle.

Some scholars and believers think that Hel and Frau Holle may be connected, and possibly the same Goddess. While others think that belief is completely misguided. Even this one account (in German) I found online from the local Berlin Körper Geist Seele Magazine [link]tries to convey the claim they are the same Goddess. Certainly they both have some similarities, such as connections with the dead. But I am always personally a little leery of the scholarship that tries to make a vast amalgam of the various deities. A Berlin tourist site [link]mentions it briefly in English and calls it Hel’s Pond.

Once at the site, my friend and I walked around it. We managed to find a nice little lull on one side of the park where no one else was around where we were able to quietly pour out drinks in offering to the Goddess, and give offerings. We each hailed the Goddess in our own observances. I would say that the offerings were well received because two magpies descended before us on the path, as soon as we finished giving our offerings. The avian duo paused a moment before us on the path, and then flitted away.

For more information, go here: [link]