wyrdwanderings:

Wights Stalle/Altar, overall view and close-up:

Seen here is the stalle/altar space I set up in my home for the Wights and other entities that just might happen by.

Candles in lieu of hearths, material wealth offering bowls with currency from all over, a bottle filled with water collected from the first big storm of the season (thunder water), a hammer, and a stone circle aligned to the cardinal directions with an offering stone in the centre. 

I think I’ll be setting up a house wight cabin soon.

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.
Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.
For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:
WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.
BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.
EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.
NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.
WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

Aww, thank you. :3
It is based on the tale of Beowulf, but the character is completely different, which naturally also changes the story. What was once a story about manly men succeeding at what they usually do best anyway is now a story about ostracism and abuse, and probably won’t see light of day for a long time because it still needs work on a structural level and a lot of research.
As I’m sure you can guess, he is a seiðmaðr, or O.E. *sidsguma.

I wholly look forward to reading it, when it comes to fruition!
It strikes plenty of chords, let me tell you.

I am compelled to give you a hug. :(

Far be it from me to resist someone compelled to hug. :>
*Hugs*
Art does fascinating things to the brain! 
I’m glad I have kin that understand the importance of Safe Spaces as an extension of Frithyard. Kin that love and accept me for who I am, regardless of what turmoil might go on in my headspace. 
That, and, people who understand that Ergi is very much a post-Christianisation concept, and are both willing and able to kick the ass of any who pile their own baggage onto Heathenry!

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.

Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.

For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:

WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.

BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.

EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.

NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.

WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

Aww, thank you. :3

It is based on the tale of Beowulf, but the character is completely different, which naturally also changes the story. What was once a story about manly men succeeding at what they usually do best anyway is now a story about ostracism and abuse, and probably won’t see light of day for a long time because it still needs work on a structural level and a lot of research.

As I’m sure you can guess, he is a seiðmaðr, or O.E. *sidsguma.

I wholly look forward to reading it, when it comes to fruition!

It strikes plenty of chords, let me tell you.

I am compelled to give you a hug. :(

Far be it from me to resist someone compelled to hug. :>

*Hugs*

Art does fascinating things to the brain! 

I’m glad I have kin that understand the importance of Safe Spaces as an extension of Frithyard. Kin that love and accept me for who I am, regardless of what turmoil might go on in my headspace. 

That, and, people who understand that Ergi is very much a post-Christianisation concept, and are both willing and able to kick the ass of any who pile their own baggage onto Heathenry!

(via beowulfstits-archive)

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.
Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.
For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:
WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.
BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.
EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.
NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.
WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

Aww, thank you. :3
It is based on the tale of Beowulf, but the character is completely different, which naturally also changes the story. What was once a story about manly men succeeding at what they usually do best anyway is now a story about ostracism and abuse, and probably won’t see light of day for a long time because it still needs work on a structural level and a lot of research.
As I’m sure you can guess, he is a seiðmaðr, or O.E. *sidsguma.

I wholly look forward to reading it, when it comes to fruition!
It strikes plenty of chords, let me tell you.

annebeeche:

runicbasso:

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.

Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.

For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:

WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.

BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.

EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.

NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.

WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

Aww, thank you. :3

It is based on the tale of Beowulf, but the character is completely different, which naturally also changes the story. What was once a story about manly men succeeding at what they usually do best anyway is now a story about ostracism and abuse, and probably won’t see light of day for a long time because it still needs work on a structural level and a lot of research.

As I’m sure you can guess, he is a seiðmaðr, or O.E. *sidsguma.

I wholly look forward to reading it, when it comes to fruition!

It strikes plenty of chords, let me tell you.

(via beowulfstits-archive)

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.
Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.
For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:
WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.
BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.
EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.
NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.
WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

annebeeche:

Revision of the portrait of Beowulf Ecgþeowing. It was suggested to me that I darken the background to give the picture a bit of depth and so I did.

Only five Old English words in the Anglo-Frisian runic alphabet are repeated (backward and forward) in the background, and all five of them have been enlarged once. Using the Anglo-Frisian fuþorc and the Bosworth-and-Toller dictionary it is possible to read and translate each of these words.

For those who are not interested in playing the translating game or would like some context, here are offhand information on  the words as I understand them, and as interpreted for this character:

WÆRLOGA: becomes modern English “warlock”. In the Germanic period this word meant not a wizard but literally “promise-breaker”, a liar, a destroyer of the social order. This was one of the strongest words in the language and could be used to curse someone.

BÆDLING: Refers to a submissive male homosexual partner, and/or to an effeminate man. The “bæd” in becomes our present day “bad”. This semantic shift can give you an idea of how effeminacy in men was regarded in the Germanic world.

EARG: Effeminacy in a man (“cowardliness”, modesty, timidity, submissiveness, dishonesty), or masculinity in a woman (assertiveness, brashness, dominance). This word is so severe that there were laws in Germanic societies controlling this use. If you called another person earg, you generally had to defend your claim in a holmgang, a duel to the blood. If you were called earg, you had to defend your own reputation in the holmgang or someone could fight for you on your behalf if you were a woman or not able-bodied. One cold be exiled from society simply for being earg.

NIÞING: This word means villain or criminal, but it more closely means a social outcast or even an exile or outlaw, literally outside the protection of the law.

WICCA: Not the neopagan religion, simply the word specifically for a male witch. The female counterpart is wicce.This etymology is the reason why I firmly insist that “witch” is a unisex word. Witchcraft was considered a feminine art and hence men who practiced witchcraft were earg. In Iceland, where the Nordic language and tradition was best preserved thanks to its geographical isolation, over 90% percent of the witches targeted were men despite the witchhunt taking place many centuries after the viking age.

This brought tears to my eyes. Absolutely beautiful! 

Vardlokkur for Walpurgis

The ensemble is as follows:
Four instrumentalists, each strategically placed at north, south, east, and west.
- Three (3) singing bowls, representing the wells of Urdrbrunnr, Hvergelmir, and Mimisbrunnr, as well as the Norns (Urd, Verdandi, Skuld).
- One (1) drum, representing the vibrations of the world tree
- One (1) vocalist, representing Odin as the Wisdom-seeking Wanderer
- One (1) narrator, representing the Volva of the Voluspa

This composition marks a one year anniversary of sorts; a milestone for my kindred, as well as myself. This is the third Vardlokkur in my series for the Holytides.
____________________________________________________________

Weiterlesen

"Your hair is grey," a youngster bold told one unmet before,
“The harp betrays you as a Skald; but though you´re versed in lore:
What gain is yours beside the hearth? No land you hold; your bread
is earned each day, as witty words win rings - or cost your head.”

"Odin touched me, God of Poets, that verse should be my life,
more dear to me than riches´ loads, as I for beauty strive.
My lips flow with Odhroerir´s flood, for war-time and for Thing;
to fight I need not spill my blood, to serve my folk I sing.”

"And you, fair Seeress", spoke again the young man, "What of you?
Such strange-garbed woman will not fain a husband ever woo.
When you in swooning madness reel and talk to shades from Hel,
distrust is always at your heel, though you help those who ail.”

"Odin touched me, God of Sight, that I should walk alone.
I wander hidden ways at night and talk to tree and stone.
Seeking wisdom is more meet than foolish people´s mirth
and Hroptr´s ecstasy more sweet than man´s in Middle-Earth.”

"You Warrior, why you rage and roam I´ll never understand.
While others seek a peaceful home, you fight in foreign lands.
What drives you to the dance of spears until you die or win?
Both friends and foes will shun and fear one who wears Berserk skin.”

"Odin touched me, God of War, that I may never rest.
His battle-rapture makes me roar, his fury fills my breast.
Into the fray I lead my men, red ruin in our wake,
and when the frenzy takes me, then I fight for fighting´s sake.”

Then all went on their different way; the young man stood in thought.
Years later heard he, in a lay, what fate to them had brought:
The Warrior was remembered by all, he died at the height of his fame.
The Seeress saw him on his way to Valhall, and the Skald made immortal his name.

— Three Ways, by Michaela Macha (2006)

The Lay of Wolf-Time


As Stubborn as Hel’s Bull by wanderingmage
Photograph taken June 2011 in Berlin, Germany at Alboinplatz in the Templehof area.According to local folk tradition, there was a sacrificial stone altar beside the great lake tended by a pagan priest, and the Goddess Hel (who was believed to dwell at the bottom of the lake) would send up black bulls that emerged from the water. These bulls would help the priest clear the land, and work it. The land itself was blessed, and would provide plenty of grain that kept the priest well fed.But as the priest grew old, he took it as a sign when one day a Christian monk appeared at the lake that his time on Midgard was ending. He asked the holy man to continue to look after the place of sacrifice. But after the Pagan priest had passed from the world of the living the monk refused to honor a Pagan Goddess. Hel was greatly displeased and sent Her bulls foaming up from the water after the monk, and the monk was killed. Since then, it is said in some versions of the local folk tales that instead of waiting for others to sacrifice to Her in an age of Christianity, that the Goddess Herself lures victims to Her holy waters, and takes them as drowned sacrifices.I am uncertain if this particular folk tale has been translated into English, but through the years, and the pagan grapevine I’ve heard of several other pagans who have in one source or another stumbled across this local folk tale. There appears to be other versions of the folk tradition out there as well, such as an alternate version that describes the Christian monk reconverting back to paganism after being chased by the Goddess’s bull, or a version where instead of this being Hel’s pond it belongs to Frau Holle.Some scholars and believers think that Hel and Frau Holle may be connected, and possibly the same Goddess. While others think that belief is completely misguided. Even this one account (in German) I found online from the local Berlin Körper Geist Seele Magazine [link]tries to convey the claim they are the same Goddess. Certainly they both have some similarities, such as connections with the dead. But I am always personally a little leery of the scholarship that tries to make a vast amalgam of the various deities. A Berlin tourist site [link]mentions it briefly in English and calls it Hel’s Pond.Once at the site, my friend and I walked around it. We managed to find a nice little lull on one side of the park where no one else was around where we were able to quietly pour out drinks in offering to the Goddess, and give offerings. We each hailed the Goddess in our own observances. I would say that the offerings were well received because two magpies descended before us on the path, as soon as we finished giving our offerings. The avian duo paused a moment before us on the path, and then flitted away.For more information, go here: [link]

As Stubborn as Hel’s Bull by wanderingmage

Photograph taken June 2011 in Berlin, Germany at Alboinplatz in the Templehof area.

According to local folk tradition, there was a sacrificial stone altar beside the great lake tended by a pagan priest, and the Goddess Hel (who was believed to dwell at the bottom of the lake) would send up black bulls that emerged from the water. These bulls would help the priest clear the land, and work it. The land itself was blessed, and would provide plenty of grain that kept the priest well fed.

But as the priest grew old, he took it as a sign when one day a Christian monk appeared at the lake that his time on Midgard was ending. He asked the holy man to continue to look after the place of sacrifice. But after the Pagan priest had passed from the world of the living the monk refused to honor a Pagan Goddess. Hel was greatly displeased and sent Her bulls foaming up from the water after the monk, and the monk was killed. Since then, it is said in some versions of the local folk tales that instead of waiting for others to sacrifice to Her in an age of Christianity, that the Goddess Herself lures victims to Her holy waters, and takes them as drowned sacrifices.

I am uncertain if this particular folk tale has been translated into English, but through the years, and the pagan grapevine I’ve heard of several other pagans who have in one source or another stumbled across this local folk tale. There appears to be other versions of the folk tradition out there as well, such as an alternate version that describes the Christian monk reconverting back to paganism after being chased by the Goddess’s bull, or a version where instead of this being Hel’s pond it belongs to Frau Holle.

Some scholars and believers think that Hel and Frau Holle may be connected, and possibly the same Goddess. While others think that belief is completely misguided. Even this one account (in German) I found online from the local Berlin Körper Geist Seele Magazine [link]tries to convey the claim they are the same Goddess. Certainly they both have some similarities, such as connections with the dead. But I am always personally a little leery of the scholarship that tries to make a vast amalgam of the various deities. A Berlin tourist site [link]mentions it briefly in English and calls it Hel’s Pond.

Once at the site, my friend and I walked around it. We managed to find a nice little lull on one side of the park where no one else was around where we were able to quietly pour out drinks in offering to the Goddess, and give offerings. We each hailed the Goddess in our own observances. I would say that the offerings were well received because two magpies descended before us on the path, as soon as we finished giving our offerings. The avian duo paused a moment before us on the path, and then flitted away.

For more information, go here: [link]